Spectra Professional Meter (Week 2 Handout) by John Budde

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Spectra B(function() { var scribd = document.createElement(“script”); scribd.type = “text/javascript”; scribd.async = true; scribd.src = “http://www.scribd.com/javascripts/embed_code/inject.js”; var s = document.getElementsByTagName(“script”)[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(scribd, s); })();

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Exposure Meter Methods (Week 2 Handouts) by John Budde

INCIDENT EXPOSURE METHOD

1. Set ISO for appropriate film stock
2. Insert appropriate calculating slide in slot behind photosphere
3. Place meter in same light as subject and aim photosphere toward lens
4. Note luminance reading on foot-candle read-out scale
5. Match scale reading with appropriate slide indicator on calculator
6. All resultant alignments of f-stops and shutter speeds on calculator will now yield identical amounts of exposure
7. For normal filming (180 degree shutter at 24fps) locate the f: # directly aligned with 1/48 second and set lens iris accordingly

REFLECTED EXPOSURE METHODS

WIDE ANGLE METHOD

Replace step 3 above with the following technique:
With the reflected grid attached over photocell, aim the meter at the subject and take reading

SPOT METER METHODS

NOTE: For the three methods below, start with these settings:

1. Set ISO for appropriate film stock
2. Read the area of interest with the center spot in the meter viewfinder
3. Note luminance reading (meter scale numbers) within n viewfinder
4. Match meter scale number from viewfinder to same on calculator
5. All resultant alignments of f-stops and shutter speeds on calculator Will now yield identical amounts of exposure equal to 18% gray
6. For normal filming (180 degree shutter at 24fps) locate the f: # directly aligned with 1/48 second and set lens iris accordingly

SINGLE POINT METHOD:
Aim the spot in the viewfinder at an 18% gray card placed in the same light as subject. Make exposure for this value.

TWO POINT METHOD:
Aim the spot in the viewfinder at the second brightest and next to darkest values within the scene. Place the exposure at the mid-point between these two levels.

MULTI-POINT METHOD:
Aim the spot in the viewfinder at various, areas within the scene. Compare meter scale numbers and locate a value which you would like to realize as 18%) ray. Make exposure for this value.

Exposure Meter Methods//

Film 2: Advanced Preproduction and Development | NFLM3670

Film 2: Advanced Preproduction and Development NFLM3670 

B 15 sessions. Wed.,6:00 p.m.-7:50 p.m., beg. SEP. 7. Leslie McCleave

Student filmmakers learn how to lay the groundwork for an advanced narrative, documentary, or experimental film or digital motion picture project. A variety of approaches to visual storytelling are examined from the concept to dramatic structures, character development, tone, and style. Each student develops a script for a seven- to ten-minute project based in or around New York City. In the second half of the course, students engage in a series of exercises that help them find the right artistic and practical approaches to their scripts while they continue refining their stories. They learn to develop a visual approach to written material. The important ways in which short films differ from full-length features are considered, and the workshop ends with shot breakdowns, planning, storyboarding, and location scouting. Prerequisite: Filmmaking Studio 1 or equivalent experience. This course must be taken before Film 3: Advanced Film Production. Class meets in Studio N400, 66 Fifth Avenue.

The Producer’s Role | NFLM3456

The Producer’s Role NFLM3456 

A 15 sessions. Thurs., 6:00 p.m.-7:50 p.m., beg. Sept. 1.

Charles H Schultz 91

Once a film is in preproduction, the producer is responsible for providing the best possible support system. The producer must organize all the elements, human and material, to implement the creative team’s artistic vision. A producer’s duties may include legal and accounting work; revising the script; casting actors; finding props, wardrobe, and equipment within budget; and working with the director and editor during and after the shoot. Low- budget and student filmmaking provides invaluable experience as preparation for larger productions, enabling students to learn to assess technical materials as well as the skills and talents of above- and below-the-line personnel. This course tracks the producer’s role from the selection of material to the delivery of the production. Students choose a project and spend the term developing a professional-quality proposal. (3 credits) CRN: 1683 

 

Filmmaking Lab: Art, Technology, and Tools | NFLM 3632

NFLM 3632 | Filmmaking Lab | Tue 11:40-2:40pm | 66 Fifth Ave, N400 | Jeremy Brooke

A 15 sessions. Tues., 12:00 p.m.-3:00 p.m., beg. beg. Aug. 30.

Jeremy Brooke

To realize an artistic vision in film, the filmmaker needs a thorough understanding of the technology, process, and tools of filmmaking. In this hands-on course, students explore advanced concepts and techniques in film and digital media production through in-class assignments and exercises evolving into increasingly complex collaborative projects. The class covers a range of topics, including operation of advanced 16mm film and HD digital cameras, film stocks and video formats, the structure of a film crew and the responsibilities of its members, lenses and lighting equipment, shooting exteriors and interiors, gripping, production design, field sound recording, preproduction planning and breakdowns, film and HD workflows, and the collaborative process. Working as a team, students set up and shoot several scenes in class and two scenes on location using sync-sound film and HD cameras and rotating crew positions. The class screens and reviews the scenes afterward. Students hone their skills and work collaboratively to master various aspects of film production, gaining the technical knowledge necessary to successfully execute advanced film and video projects. (3 credits) CRN: 6722 

Cinematography & Lighting | NFLM 3515

NFLM 3515 | Cinematography and Lighting | R 11:45-3:00pm | 66 Fifth Ave, N400 | John Budde

Cinematography and Lighting NFLM3515 

A 15 sessions. Thurs., 12:00 p.m.-3:00 p.m., beg. Sept. 1. John Budde

In this workshop, students explore theoretical and practical elements of cinematography, with an emphasis on lighting. While learning techniques of studio and location lighting, students also study historical and contemporary trends and styles. Theoretical topics include exposure, color theory, and filters. Professional techniques to alter the look of a film are demonstrated and discussed. Practical tests and scenes are shot using color and black &

white film stocks and digital video. Students explore similarities and differences between film and digital formats, particularly in framing, contrast, and exposure. Recommended for students planning to take Film 3: Advanced Film Production. (3 credits) CRN: 1684