Spectra Professional Meter (Week 2 Handout) by John Budde

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Exposure Meter Methods (Week 2 Handouts) by John Budde

INCIDENT EXPOSURE METHOD

1. Set ISO for appropriate film stock
2. Insert appropriate calculating slide in slot behind photosphere
3. Place meter in same light as subject and aim photosphere toward lens
4. Note luminance reading on foot-candle read-out scale
5. Match scale reading with appropriate slide indicator on calculator
6. All resultant alignments of f-stops and shutter speeds on calculator will now yield identical amounts of exposure
7. For normal filming (180 degree shutter at 24fps) locate the f: # directly aligned with 1/48 second and set lens iris accordingly

REFLECTED EXPOSURE METHODS

WIDE ANGLE METHOD

Replace step 3 above with the following technique:
With the reflected grid attached over photocell, aim the meter at the subject and take reading

SPOT METER METHODS

NOTE: For the three methods below, start with these settings:

1. Set ISO for appropriate film stock
2. Read the area of interest with the center spot in the meter viewfinder
3. Note luminance reading (meter scale numbers) within n viewfinder
4. Match meter scale number from viewfinder to same on calculator
5. All resultant alignments of f-stops and shutter speeds on calculator Will now yield identical amounts of exposure equal to 18% gray
6. For normal filming (180 degree shutter at 24fps) locate the f: # directly aligned with 1/48 second and set lens iris accordingly

SINGLE POINT METHOD:
Aim the spot in the viewfinder at an 18% gray card placed in the same light as subject. Make exposure for this value.

TWO POINT METHOD:
Aim the spot in the viewfinder at the second brightest and next to darkest values within the scene. Place the exposure at the mid-point between these two levels.

MULTI-POINT METHOD:
Aim the spot in the viewfinder at various, areas within the scene. Compare meter scale numbers and locate a value which you would like to realize as 18%) ray. Make exposure for this value.

Exposure Meter Methods//

Film 2: Advanced Preproduction and Development | NFLM3670

Film 2: Advanced Preproduction and Development NFLM3670 

B 15 sessions. Wed.,6:00 p.m.-7:50 p.m., beg. SEP. 7. Leslie McCleave

Student filmmakers learn how to lay the groundwork for an advanced narrative, documentary, or experimental film or digital motion picture project. A variety of approaches to visual storytelling are examined from the concept to dramatic structures, character development, tone, and style. Each student develops a script for a seven- to ten-minute project based in or around New York City. In the second half of the course, students engage in a series of exercises that help them find the right artistic and practical approaches to their scripts while they continue refining their stories. They learn to develop a visual approach to written material. The important ways in which short films differ from full-length features are considered, and the workshop ends with shot breakdowns, planning, storyboarding, and location scouting. Prerequisite: Filmmaking Studio 1 or equivalent experience. This course must be taken before Film 3: Advanced Film Production. Class meets in Studio N400, 66 Fifth Avenue.

Documentary Production Workshop | NFLM3715

A 15 sessions. Wed., 6:00 p.m.-8:40 p.m., beg. Aug. 31. Leslie McCleave

Students learn the essentials of shooting a five- to seven-minute documentary. They learn how to develop an idea, research the topic, interview subjects, and create a visual strategy and master basic skills of location scouting, lighting, and shooting. They also explore the use of still photographs, artwork, and stock footage. Students may work individually or in groups and by the end of the term should have a working rough cut or fine cut edited with Final Cut Pro. Students have access to New School digital video cameras but must have a firewire drive. (3 credits) CRN: 3483 

 

Screenwriting 1: Fundamentals | NSRW3810

Screenwriting 1: Fundamentals NSRW3810 

15 sessions. Thurs., 6:00 p.m.-7:50 p.m.,

Loren-Paul Caplin

This course for the beginning screenwriter introduces the tools, vocabulary, and techniques used to tell a screen story and put an original idea into outline form. Assignments illustrate basic three-act structure, economical use of dialogue, visual storytelling elements, development of complex characters, revelation of background information, and effective use of dramatic tension. Students become familiar with screenwriting terminology as scenes from well-known films are analyzed on video to reveal structural elements in the writing. By the end of the course, each student will have developed an original idea into a detailed step outline for a feature-length screenplay and written the opening scene. We strongly recommend that students take Script Analysis before registering for Screenwriting 1. (3 credits)

Script Analysis | NSRW2800

Script Analysis NSRW2800 

B 15 sessions. Thurs., 8:00 p.m.-9:50 p.m., beg. Sept. 1.

Loren-Paul Caplin

Whether you are a writer, a director, or a producer, an understanding of story structure and dramatic principles is essential. In-depth analysis of a screenplay’s storyline, characters, dialogue, images, and theme reveals a wide range of narrative techniques and storytelling styles, from Hollywood to independent and everything in between. Students view successful films and analyze their scripts, learning how essential information is conveyed, how story elements are communicated through visual means, how dramatic momentum is built with cause and effect, and what makes a character credible and complex. Students end the term with the ability to analyze any film script and apply that knowledge to their own screenwriting. (3 credits) Section A

 

Editing with Final Cut Pro | NFLM4627

Editing with Final Cut Pro NFLM4627 

A 15 sessions. Thurs., 6:00 p.m.-8:40 p.m., beg. Sept. 1.

Jeremy Brooke

In this independent DV era, the use of digital video setups at home gives filmmakers an economical and time-efficient way to edit their films. Creating transitions, filters, titles, layered audio, and multiple versions has never been simpler. This course offers a technical introduction to postproduction using Final Cut Pro on Macintosh computers. Using their own existing film or video footage, students learn techniques for organizing footage, capturing and editing picture and sound, and outputting to a DV tape. Note: This course is not intended for students completing a 16mm film project. Students must bring digital video footage ready to edit and a firewire drive to the first session. (3 credits) CRN: 6710